A Certain Justice - Netflix

Scotland Yard's Adam Dalgliesh investigates the puzzling murder of prestigious attorney Venetia Aldridge in this adaptation of P.D. James's novel. After Aldridge is brutally murdered in her office, Dalgliesh and Inspector Kate Miskin go to work.

A Certain Justice - Netflix

Type: Scripted

Languages: English

Status: Ended

Runtime: 60 minutes

Premier: 1998-07-14

A Certain Justice - A Theory of Justice - Netflix

A Theory of Justice is a work of political philosophy and ethics by John Rawls, in which the author attempts to solve the problem of distributive justice (the socially just distribution of goods in a society) by utilising a variant of the familiar device of the social contract. The resultant theory is known as “Justice as Fairness”, from which Rawls derives his two principles of justice. Together, they dictate that society should be structured so that the greatest possible amount of liberty is given to its members, limited only by the notion that the liberty of any one member shall not infringe upon that of any other member. Secondly, inequalities – either social or economic – are only to be allowed if the worst off will be better off than they might be under an equal distribution. Finally, if there is such a beneficial inequality, this inequality should not make it harder for those without resources to occupy positions of power – for instance, public office. First published in 1971, A Theory of Justice was revised in 1975 (for the translated editions) and 1999.

A Certain Justice - The Two Principles of Justice - Netflix

“First Principle: Each person is to have an equal right to the most extensive total system of equal basic liberties compatible with a similar system of liberty for all.”

In chapter forty-seven, Rawls makes his final clarification on the principles of justice in one paragraph:

“Second Principle: Social and economic inequalities are to be arranged so that they are both: (a) to the greatest benefit of the least advantaged, consistent with the just savings principle, and (b) attached to offices and positions open to all under conditions of fair equality of opportunity.” These principles are lexically ordered, and Rawls emphasizes the priority of liberty. The first principle is often called the greatest equal liberty principle. The second, until (b), the difference principle and the final addendum in (b) the equal opportunity principle.

A Certain Justice - References - Netflix